“One half from the East” Nadia Hashimi

onehalffromtheeastRated 5 stars ***** ARC. Published September 6, 2016. Harper Collins. 256 p. (Includes “Author’s Note.”)

In Afghanistan, there exists a tradition called bacha posh.” If a family doesn’t have a son, and are down on their luck, they are encouraged to change a daughter into a bacha posh, which brings good luck. The daughter must be young enough to not have reached puberty because she is expected to look and act like a boy. Gone are long skirts, headscarves, and all dainty girl behaviors. As a bacha posh, she is free to run, get dirty, and do things girls would never be allowed to do in Afghani society.

Ten-year-old Obayda becomes her family’s bacha posh after her father loses his leg in a car bombing and is unable to work. With only four daughters, the family desperately needs the luck a bacha posh can bring them. At first Obayda is terrified of her new role, not sure how to be a boy. However, with the help of Rahima, a thirteen-year-old bacha posh, Obayda soon comes to love the freedom of being a boy. Unfortunately they can’t remain a bacha posh forever. Soon they must change back into a girl and forget they were ever boys, but how does one go from freedom to shackles?

The world of gender inequality is explored in “One half from the East,” while readers are also introduced to the culture of Afghan people. It is sure to be a conversation starter, and offers great lessons on gender roles and expectations.

Recommended for ages 9-14.

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Author: Mrs. Mac

As a School Librarian, I was Co-Chair of REFORMA's (The National Association to Promote Library Services to the Latinos and Spanish Speaking) CAYASC (Children & Young Adult Services Committee) for 2 yrs. As Co-Chair, I was in charge of all things YA. I have been a member of YALSA (Young Adult Library Services Association) for many years, and have worked as a school librarian for many years. When I'm not blogging, I like to read, run, race and sing - not necessarily in that order. My blog reviews books I enjoyed (or didn't enjoy), which leaves you to ask yourself "Should I Read it or Not?"

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