“Mama and Papa have a store” AND “La tienda de mamá y papá” written and illustrated by Amelia Lau Carling

Rated 4 stars **** Lee & Low. 2016. (First published in 1998 by Dial.)

mamaandpaphaveastorelatiendademamaypapaLee & Low republished these out-of-print editions in both English and Spanish.

In 1938, the author’s parents fled their village in China before the Japanese invaded at the advent of World War II. Settling in Guatemala City, they raised their six children in the back of a grocery store, which sold all sorts of sundries.

Through detailed watercolor drawings, the author shares her memories of a typical day spent playing in the store with her brothers and sisters, meeting Mayan Indians who came from their faraway village to buy colorful thread, and interacting with Guatemalan and Chinese patrons. By the end of the book, readers will have a clear idea of what it was like for a hardworking Chinese immigrant family to make their way in a new world.

I would have preferred to have both the Spanish and English versions in a single book, rather than in two different books, as it would’ve been easier for children learning each language to see the opposite language as they practiced.

Recommended for ages 6-10.

 

 

“Rainbow weaver: Tejedora del arcoíris” Linda Elovitz Marshall; illustrated by Elisa Chavarri

Rated 5 stars ***** Children’s Book Press. 2016. (Includes “Glossary and Pronunciation Guide,” and “Author’s Note.”)

rainbowweaverThis bilingual picture book tells the story of Ixchel, who lives in the mountains above Lake Atitlán in Guatemala. She comes from a long line of Mayan weavers, and wants to weave with her mother to help pay for her schooling. Ixchel is too young to weave, and her mother can’t afford thread for her attempts, so she decides to create her own loom and thread from various materials. Her early results are disappointing but she persists and, through recycling colorful plastic bags littering her village, winds up with an item of beauty.

Scans and photos of actual Mayan weavings are used in Chavarri’s drawings. These works, incorporated into her full-page colorful drawings, beautifully illustrate Ixchel’s story and show how Mayan designs resemble rainbows.

Though Ixchel is fiction, a group of weavers in Guatemala create purses, baskets and more from plastic bags and threads, which they sell through cooperatives in the United States and other countries. In the 1980’s an organization called “Mayan Hands” was formed to help these weavers sell their products. Proceeds from the sale of “Rainbow weaver” will not only help weavers, but also help pay for medical care and for their children to go to school.

Recommended for ages 5-10.

“Olinguito, from A to Z! /Olinguito, de la A a la Z!” Lulu Delacre

Rated 5 stars ***** 2016. Illustrated by Lulu Delacre. Children’s Book Press (Lee & Low). IncludOlinguitofromAtoZOlinguitoDelaAalaZes descriptive narratives on the Discovery of the Olinguito, The Cloud Forest and The Illustrations. Also includes ways readers can become explorers within the pages of the book as well as through online activities. The book also includes a detailed Glossary of scientific names of plants and animals in the cloud forest, complete with illustrations of each one, a list of More Helpful Words, and a detailed list of the Author’s Sources.

This amazingly detailed, well-researched and beautifully illustrated bilingual picture book for older and younger readers is more than an A to Z book of plants and animals found in the Ecuadorian Andes cloud forest. Used in conjunction with the very detailed Glossary, each page unveils unique and varied life forms found in this fascinating cloud forest.

Readers will learn about unusual creatures such as the tanager, quetzal, barbet and, of course, the olinguito. Not to be outdone, reading about vegetation with interesting sounding names like the Bomarea flower, passiflora, wax palm and epiphytes will also pique their curiosity. Each page contains rich stores of knowledge waiting to be explored. Each of the more than 40 plants and animals in the book have a story to tell, and can easily become extensive research projects for its elementary and middle school readers.

Well known author and illustrator Lulu Delacre has outdone herself with her latest book. I expect “Olinguito, from A to Z! /Olinguito, de la A a la Z!” will create quite a stir at next year’s American Library Association’s Youth Media Awards. I consider it a candidate for the Robert F. Sibert Informational Book Award, as well as for the Pura Belpré Author Award. Remember that you read it first here!

Highly recommended for ages 7-14.

“Maya’s blanket/La manta de Maya” Monica Brown

Rated 5 stars ***** 2015. Illustrated by David Diaz. Children’s Book Press (Lee & Low). Includes a Glossary and Author’s note.

MayasBlanketYoung Maya loves the beautiful blanket Abuelita stitched for her when she was a baby. When the blanket gets old, she and Abuelita make it into a lovely dress. As the years pass by readers see Maya growing up as the blanket changes into many different items, which have their own significance to Maya. What always stays the same is that each newly created item always has the stamp of love placed upon it by Abuelita and Maya.

David Diaz’s bold, colorful, jewel tone, full page illustrations complement Monica Brown’s bilingual picture book about a young girl’s love for her grandmother and her gift. “With her own two hands and Abuelita’s help” is a refrain repeated during each transformation of the blanket, clearly showing their special relationship. As they read, young children will enjoy reciting it and talking about how they can recycle their own special gifts.

Recommended for ages 6-10.

“Pink fire trucks: Los camiones de bomberos de color rosado” Gladys Elizabeth Barbieri

Rated 5 stars ***** Big Tent Books. 2013.

PinkFireTrucksThe children are very excited to celebrate Career Day at their school. Gladys wants to be a firefighter when she grows up but feels discouraged by Rudy, a boy in her class, who insists she should “stick to a girl job.” With grace and strength, Gladys proves that girls can do anything boys can do.

“Pink fire trucks” is a bilingual picture book which shows young girls they can break out of the traditional job roles for women, and expand their horizons into careers previously closed to them.

Recommended for ages 6-10.

“Rubber Shoes: A lesson in gratitude; Los zapatos de goma: Una leccion de gratitud” Gladys Elizabeth Barbieri

Rated 3 stars *** Big Tent Books. 2011.

RubberShoesALessonInGratitudeIn this bilingual picture book, a young girl is upset with her mother because she picks out ugly, rubber shoes for her when they go shopping instead of pretty ballet slippers. Her goal in life becomes to destroy the shoes, but they prove indestructible. In time, she winds up learning a lesson that will stay with her long past the life of her ugly, rubber shoes.

The storyline of a young girl not liking her shoes and getting several “time outs” for being naughty is basic enough, however, the author uses words like “brisk pace, expression, assortment” and others in telling the story which seem more grown up than that which a young 5 or 6 year old child would use on their own. With the words geared more towards someone in the 9 or 10-year-old age range, I think it would have been better to have the child in the story be older so the words would match her age.

Despite these inconsistencies “Rubber Shoes” has an important lesson to tell so I’ll recommend it, with these reservations, for ages 7-10.

“Finding the music: En pos de la música” Jennifer Torres

Rated 4 stars **** Children’s Book Press (Lee & Low Books). 2015. (Includes a Glossary and Pronunciation Guide as well as an Author’s Note.)

FindingTheMusicEnPosDeLaMusicaReyna is upset because her mother’s restaurant is too noisy and, while expressing her exasperation, accidentally breaks her grandfather’s vihuela (a guitar used to play mariachi music.) While trying to get it fixed she discovers various aspects of her grandfather’s musical career, which had not previously been of interest. Reyna’s journey to fix the vihuela leads to a journey of her own roots, leaving her with a greater appreciation of her grandfather’s accomplishments.

This well written bilingual picture book is a fun way to introduce young children to vihuelas and mariachi music, while Alarcao’s realistic drawings help Reyna’s story come to life.

Recommended for ages 7-10.