“Girl in snow” Danya Kukafka

Rated 3 stars *** ARC. Ebook. Simon & Schuster. To be published August 22, 2017.

GirlInSnowFifteen-year-old Lucinda Hayes is found murdered on a snowy carousel in the park. The police have a list of suspects, but no firm leads. In alternating chapters, three people who are close to the case tell their stories. As they talk readers learn more details about their lives, as well as Lucinda’s life.

Jade hated Lucinda and wanted her gone because her boyfriend was Jade’s former best friend and only true love. To make sure Lucinda disappeared she performed a witch’s spell, and it worked. Did she kill Lucinda with her spell? Cameron loved Lucinda but, though they went to school together, Lucinda never noticed him. He liked spying on her at night but, sometimes, things went fuzzy and he didn’t always remember. He loved her, but did he kill her?

Russ is one of the detectives assigned to the case, even though he’d been partners with Cameron’s father and knows the family. As he tells his story, readers soon realize he is hiding a secret of his own. Each of these three talk about other suspects so, when the killer is finally revealed, readers will be in for a huge shock. Kukafka definitely fooled me.

Though the book has teenage protagonists, there are many themes which tilt the book more towards adult readers. Thus I will recommend it for readers eighteen and older.

Recommended for Adults.

 

“Romancing the dark in the city of light” Ann Jacobus

Rated 2 stars ** 2015. Thomas Dunne. (St. Martin’s Griffin). 276 p. (Also includes Suicide Prevention Resources, and Discussion Questions.)

RomancingTheDarkInTheCityOfLightForced to move to Paris to live with her very rich mother after being kicked out of four high schools, eighteen-year-old Summer is not a happy camper. In order to inherit a lot of money, her grandfather’s will mandates that she graduate from a private high school and finish college by the age of twenty-two, but Summer can’t muster up the interest needed to finish the last five weeks of her senior year. She’d rather spend time drinking, and dreaming of the Parisian boyfriend she absolutely MUST find so she could have a purpose for her life.

After a suicide on the Metro she meets the very handsome Kurt, who she soon decides is going to be the boyfriend she’s been seeking. She also feels the same way about Moony, a fellow student at her high school. As time goes on, Summer spends more time getting drunk and hanging out with Kurt than she does with Moony – even though he’s the one who makes her heart flutter. With just a few weeks left before she’s supposed to graduate, Summer makes a decision that will forever change not only her life, but also Moony’s.

I wasn’t a fan of this book. I knew Summer had big problems, but some of what happened to her seemed a bit far fetched as well as fantastical. I also had a problem with her constant neediness and the way she couldn’t handle rejection – even something as simple as someone saying they had to go to a doctor’s appointment when she’d invited them to coffee.

Though I enjoyed the descriptions of Paris, which reminded me of the time I’d spent there many years ago, Moony was the only one that really grabbed my interest as I found Kurt and Summer to be clichés. It is because of Moony that I gave this book two stars instead of one.

I’ll leave it up to those of you in the 16 and older range to decide if you want to read it or not.

“A dictionary of mutual understanding” Jackie Copleton

Rated 3 stars *** ARC. Published December 1, 2015. Penguin Books.

ADictionaryOfMutualUnderstandingAmaterasu Takahashi has had a tough life, and has spent 40 years in the United States trying to forget about the atomic bomb dropped on Nagasaki that killed everyone she held dear, including her daughter and grandson. With her husband now dead, and everyone she loved gone, Amaterasu drinks herself into oblivion hoping to forget the pain of her memories. Her life is turned upside down when a very burned, heavily scarred man knocks on her door, insisting he’s her long-lost grandson Hideo, forcing her to relive the memories she’s been trying desperately to forget.

Amaterasu’s story is told through flashbacks, as multiple voices painstakingly remove layers to reveal the truth about herself she’s buried for 40 years. Each chapter begins with a definition of a Japanese word, followed by either a present day interaction between Amaterasu and Hideo or a flashback. These flashbacks from different characters sometimes got me confused but I learned much about August 9, 1945, when the atomic bomb was dropped, as well as a little of Japan’s history and traditions.

Though a bit confusing due to the constant back-and-forth narratives, “A dictionary of mutual understanding” is a good cross-cultural, historical look at Japan and the people of Nagasaki. Amaterasu’s character is very believable, and the reasons she had to act the way she did will generate much empathy from readers.

Recommended for Adults.

“Try not to breathe” Holly Seddon

Rated 4 stars **** ARC. Ebook. Published February 23, 2016. Ballantine Books.

TryNotToBreatheAmy Stevenson was 15 years old in 1995 when she went missing. She was found three days later savagely beaten, sexually assaulted, with multiple broken bones and severe brain damage. No suspect was ever found.

It is now 2010 and Alex Dale is writing about a brain doctor’s work in a neuro-disability ward with patients often typecast as “vegetables.” While on a tour of the facility she discovers Amy among the patients, which sets off her curiosity as to what happened fifteen years ago. Alex wants to dig into Amy’s past to locate clues, but her own past stands in the way. Her inability to stay sober has cost more than her marriage and job, as her self-esteem is at an all time low. If she manages to save Amy she may save herself.

As Amy’s foggy brain begins to sift through the events leading up to her attack, Alex tries to conquer her alcoholic demons. Through flashbacks and the present time, Seddon masterfully winds a path of intrigue, which will lead readers to a truth that will leave them reeling in disbelief.

Highly recommended for Adults.

“When no one is watching” Joseph Hayes

Rated 4 stars **** Ebook. 2010. (Includes “Discussion Questions.”)

WhenNoOneIsWatchingBlair Van Howe and Danny Moran had been the best of friends since their days in law school. Both are rising stars in their prominent law firm, but one fateful evening everything came to a screeching halt for Danny. Though a great lawyer he had problems holding his liquor, and that particular night was too intoxicated to drive.

Blair was thrilled to drive Danny’s Porsche, but wound up causing an accident that killed an innocent driver. Afraid his budding political career would suffer if the truth came out Blair framed Danny, allowing him to take the fall for his own crime. Danny was too drunk to know he wasn’t at fault, while Blair believed he could make great changes in other’s lives if he stayed quiet about the accident and kept his political dreams alive.

Throughout the book, as Hayes tells Danny and Blair’s story and the truth struggles a bit too long to be revealed, readers are constantly brought back to the question of who had the better life. Was it the man one step away from becoming President who lived his life based on a lie, or was it the man who lost everything yet had everything in the end? What kind of life do you live when no one is watching?

Hayes ends his thought provoking novel with even more thought provoking Discussion Questions, sure to generate debate on these issues.

Recommended for Adult readers.

“Freedom’s child” Jax Miller

Rated 5 stars ***** ARC. Published June 2, 2015. Crown Publishers (Random House). 311 pp.

Freedom'sChildFreedom Oliver has been in the witness protection program for 18 years, ever since she served time for killing her policeman husband. After losing custody of her two children, she spent the intervening years in alcohol and rage filled fights to make herself forget the pain of their loss. Her brother’s husband served 18 years in prison for the murder of his brother. Now released, he and his brothers have revenge on their mind and are looking for Freedom.

When Freedom finds out her daughter is missing from the cult family into which she’d been adopted, she throws caution to the wind. With the steadfastness of purpose that only a mother can have for have for her children, and with the rage of a mother bear defending her cub, she is determined to move heaven and earth to find her daughter. To paraphrase the poet William Congreve “Hell hath no fury like a mother who is protecting her child,” as Freedom fights through anyone and everything to find the daughter she held 20 years ago for only two minutes and seventeen seconds.

“Freedom’s child” held me in its thrilling grip as I eagerly turned its pages to find out what would next befall Freedom. Though her life had been filled with pain, sorrow and strife, her rage and thirst for revenge allowed her to draw on her previous experiences to fight for her children as only a mother can fight. Other readers will be just as enthralled.

Highly recommended for Adult readers.

“Everything, Everything” Nicola Yoon

Rated 4 stars **** ARC. Ebook. Delacorte Books for Young Readers (Random House). Published September 1, 2015.

EverythingEverythingEighteen-year-old Madeline Whittier has spent her whole life inside her house after being diagnosed with S.C.I.D. (Severe Combined Immunodeficiency) when she was an infant. Maddy’s father and older brother were killed in an accident when she was just a baby so her life revolves around her mother and Carla, her full time nurse. Having S.C.I.D. means Maddy has never smelled the outside air, felt grass between her toes or experienced anything outside of the four walls of her home. However, since this life is all Maddy has ever known, she fills her mind with stories from books, learns about life through the internet, and plays games with her mom.

Her world’s axis tilts when a family moves in next door. Handsome Olly wearing all black, with movements as graceful as flowing water, soon becomes part of her every waking thought. Maddy has fallen in love for the first time in her life, but what can a girl with S.C.I.D. do with a love filled heart?

“Everything, Everything” is a wonderful look at the pain of S.C.I.D., which gives a new twist to the angst of teenage romance. I loved how Olly not only loved but also understood Maddy.

Recommended for ages 14 and older.

***SPOILER ALERT ****

I was confused at the end of the book as to how Maddy was able to figure out Olly was in N.Y.C. One minute she was sitting on Olly’s roof, and the next she had bought a plane ticket to meet him. I figured she must have finally sent him an email, but Yoon let readers draw their own conclusions about how they were able to reconnect. However I would have liked to have read more details about their reunion.