“In case you missed it” Sarah Darer Littman

Rated 1 stars * ARC. Published October 11, 2016. Scholastic Press. 305 p.

incaseyoumisseditSammy’s junior year is ruined when protestors at her father’s bank hack its server. Along with personal texts and emails, her online journal (where she’d written her deepest thoughts and crushes) is revealed to her entire high school world. Besides having to deal with the fallout of having her personal thoughts shared on social media, she’s lost her best friends, and has to deal with the stress of upcoming AP exams, as well as the loss of her crush. She is officially persona non grata, and it looks like there will never be any relief. Just when she thinks life can’t get any worse, it does.

I wasn’t a fan of this book. Sammy sounded much more immature than a junior in high school, as her issues and constant whining sounded middle schoolish to me. Her brother RJ also presented as immature. Though he was supposed to be 14 years old, his dialogue and behavior was more like a 6 or 8 year old.

Overall I felt the storyline wasn’t interesting, and Sammy’s petulance didn’t help. However I will leave it up to you to decide if you want to read it or not.

“The book of Laney” Myfanwy Collins

Rated 2 stars ** ARC. Ebook. Published May 17, 2015. Lacewing Books. (Includes Reference materials.)

TheBookOfLaneyWest and his best friend Mark hated high school, and planned revenge for all the times jocks ignored or made fun of them. After spending time researching terrorists, both homegrown and abroad, they were ready to make their mark on the world. Using knives, machetes and homemade bombs, they worked their way through a school bus filled with high school kids, and forever changed Laney’s world.

With West and her mother now dead, joining the father she’d never known, fifteen-year-old Laney is sent to live with her grandmother, Meme, in the woods of upstate New York in a place upon which civilization has not dared to encroach. Meme is not an exceptionally friendly woman, but she and Laney soon come to an understanding. It is with her help that Laney learns to put herself in the shoes of those who have gone before and to rely on nature for her needs. She also learns to quiet her own mind and regain the glimmer of a path for her life, which West had taken in his quest for revenge.

“The book of Laney” gave great insight into the minds of terrorists like West and Mark, as the author used real diary entries from homegrown terrorists to help readers understand why people would behave in such an horrific way. The life which Laney now found herself living, and how she saw herself after the murders, were all realistic topics.

However, I felt the book lost its attempt at being believable when Laney’s paranormal visions become its highlight. It would have been better if the author had found a realistic way to help Laney find a way to cope with her issues without having to resort to make believe. Struggling teens who may have looked to this book for insight into their own situations will not find solace through the paranormal.

I would have given the book a higher rating if the author had stayed true to the book’s premise of a young girl learning to cope with life after facing death one too many times, instead of letting it deteriorate into these visions. In addition the cover is very “blah,” and would have been lovely if it had looked like the beautiful Adirondack woods into which Laney poured so much of her heart and soul.

Because of having a major issue with this hugely unrealistic topic in the midst of realistic ones I can’t recommend this book, but will leave it up to you to decide if you want to read it or not.

 

“Pretty Girl-13” Liz Coley

Rated 5 stars ***** 2013. Katherine Tegen Books (HarperCollins). 350 pp. (Includes “Afterword” and “Author’s Note.”)

PrettyGirl-13Angie Chapman came home from her girl scout camping trip and was shocked to find out she’d been gone for 3 years. She can’t understand why she doesn’t remember this timeframe, and won’t believe her parents when they insist she is 16 years old. Gradually Angie finds out she has Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID), formerly known as Multiple Personality Disorder, and has blocked out her life for the past 3 years.

With the help of a therapist Angie struggles to piece together what happened over these lost years, but facing reality becomes more and more difficult. All she wants to do is to forget what happened in that little cabin out in the woods, but her inner selves won’t allow it. As memories from her personalities begin to be revealed, Angie’s fears and secrets threaten to overwhelm her. It will take great strength, determination and courage to keep her head above water, as well as love and acceptance from friends and family. As Angie discovers why these people came to live inside her head, she gradually realizes they each had a role to play in shaping her life and that without them, she wouldn’t be alive.

“Pretty Girl -13” takes an unflinching, dark, raw, honest, eye-opening look at the effects of DID on the person who is experiencing these multiple personalities as well as its effects on their loved ones. Coley has painstakingly done her research into this disorder, and “Pretty Girl -13” is the magnificent result.

Recommended for ages 14 and older.

Listed on the ALA (American Library Association’s) Best Fiction for Young Adults list (compiled by the Young Adult Library Services Association (YALSA)

“The Hidden Child” Camilla Lackberg

Rated 4 stars **** Fjallbacka #5. ebook. ARC. To be published May 1, 2014. Pegasus Books. (First published in Sweden as Tyskungen in 2007.)

TheHiddenChildErica Falck has just finished her maternity leave and is supposed to be working on her latest crime novel. Instead, she finds herself fascinated by her mother’s 60-year-old diaries and the discovery of a Nazi medal. Wanting to know more about what made her mother change from the fun-loving person described in the diaries into the unemotional and unloving person she knew, Erica decides to take the medal to Erik a local historian for further study.

Soon afterwards Erik is found brutally murdered, and Erica finds herself embroiled in a 60-year-old in which her mother was entangled. The diaries reveals names of a current Nazi sympathizer, the historian’s brother who survived years as a German POW, and a local woman suffering from Alzheimer’s. Each of them holds a part of these tangled threads, which soon leads to even greater mysteries and shocking truths for Erica and her detective husband to sort. Erica’s quest to find out more about her mother’s past will forever be tangled in her own future.

“The Hidden Child” uses multiple voices and viewpoints to untangle the mystery of Erik’s murder and the diaries. At first, the constant changing of voices between characters was a little disconcerting but as the story progressed it became vitally important to the storyline. Camilla Lackberg’s careful research into the historical importance Sweden played during World War II will also be an eye-opener.

Recommended for Adult readers.

“Diary of a Wimpy Kid: Greg Heffley’s Journal” Jeff Kinney

2007. Amulet Books. 217 pp.

DiaryofaWimpyKidI know, I’m totally behind the times because practically everyone else has already read this book. However since I’m on vacation and didn’t bring enough books to read, I had to go to the Public Library. Their YA section was sadly lacking in interesting titles so, when I saw this book I figured “why not?” and borrowed it to read. I’m glad I did.

Greg has just started middle school and, through the use of funny cartoon drawings and his “journal” (making sure to insist we don’t think it’s an actual “diary”) tells readers all about the horrors of middle school life. Kinney’s hysterical descriptions and drawings had me in stitches from the first few pages, and it’s easy to see why kids of all ages (especially boys) love this series. Poor Greg can’t catch a break, as all of his various schemes to achieve popularity and notoriety all fade to nothing, leaving him holding the proverbial bag on every occasion.

Boys aged 9 and up will become instant fans, and will devour the rest of the books in the series.