“Behind the red door” Megan Collins

Rated 3 stars *** ARC. ebook. Atria Books. To be published August 4, 2020.

Behind the red doorFern loves her daddy even though he was always distracted with his work. His research dealt with the effects of fear, and she was always part of his Experiments where he terrorized her for years in many ways then interviewed her about her feelings. Though she had always been truly afraid during the Experiments, his care during the follow up interviews made her feel important and loved. As she grew older the years she’d spent being tormented caused her to become anxious and develop nervous habits, but it never diminished her love for him.

When Ted called to ask for help packing for an upcoming move, Fern was thrilled because she believed he needed her. Once she arrived they took a trip to town where she picked up a book about a local woman who was kidnapped 20 years ago and was missing again. As reading about the kidnapping tugged at memories she’d long kept hidden, these remembrances began to turn her life upside down.

This book really bothered me. I can’t reveal what happened, but I can say I was not happy at how that particular situation ended. I also couldn’t understand how, as an educated Social Worker, she was so ignorant about her own father. I liked the suspense, and how she gave Fern a wonderfully loving and supportive husband.

I gave it 3 stars for its twists and turns, and will recommend it to Adults.

I received a digital advance reading copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

“The kept” James Scott

Rated 2 stars ** 2014. HarperCollins. 354 p. (Includes “Insights, Interviews & more.”)

The KeptIt’s Elspeth and her twelve-year-old son Caleb against the world of 1897 after three men killed her four children and husband when she was away from home. Only Caleb survived so, bonded by revenge, the two of them struggle through the wilderness seeking the nearest town. There Caleb gets involved with the local gangsters while Elspeth tries to survive the guilt she feels, knowing she was the reason her family was killed. Both she and Caleb have to control their demons if either expects to reach closure.

I was not a fan. The book meandered too much, and many questions weren’t answered. What was Elspeth and Jorah’s relationship in the beginning? Why did her father beat her so terribly if all she said was hello? I especially did NOT like the ending because, after taking readers through a convoluted path to get where Caleb and Elspeth finally arrived, why end the book so openly? These were just a few of my disagreements with “The kept.”

So, though I didn’t like it, I will leave it up to you Adult readers to decide if you want to read it or not.

 

“Dead to you” Lisa McMann

Rated 2 stars ** Simon Pulse. 2012. 243 p.

Dead to youEthan was seven when he was kidnapped, and is reunited with his family nine years later. At first things are strange between him, his parents, younger brother Blake, and little sister Gracie. He’s upset he can’t remember old family photos, relatives or neighbors, but is sure his memories will resurface. Ethan also has to deal with Blake’s jealousy and increasing anger at his presence. After a few months things start to settle, but a ringing doorbell forever changes life for Ethan.

I absolutely DESPISED the ending, and thought it was a complete copout on the author’s part. Why couldn’t she have given a real ending instead of those final three words? I feel like she sold Ethan out, as well as her readers. I was definitely not a happy camper, and took off one star because of the very bad ending.

Though I was EXTREMELY upset with the way the book ended, I will leave it up to you readers, ages 14 and older, to decide if you want to read it or not.

 

“After the woods” Kim Savage

Rated 2 stars ** Farrar Straus Giroux. 2016. 294 p.

After the woodsWhen sixteen-year-old Julia and her best friend Liv went for a run in the woods, a man attacked Liv with a knife. Julia rushed to her rescue and he broke her ankle but, instead of helping her, Liv ran away. That first night, when her captor fell asleep, Julia managed to escape. Despite her broken ankle and bruised, bleeding body she spent two terrified days putting as much distance as she could between them, until she was finally rescued.

Hailed as a hero because she was able to escape and lead police to her captor, Julia instantly became a media darling. However she couldn’t understand why Liv never wanted to talk about it, insisting she needed to move on. Julia wanted to know more about her captor, especially when the body of a young girl was found in the woods. Eventually Julia plows her way through a tangled web of deceit before she finds out the painful truth about her best friend.

I thought the book had potential, given its “I’m captured by a crazy guy and now have a broken ankle” scenario. However readers don’t get a survival story about Julia’s time in the woods dragging herself away from a captor used to hunting game in those same woods. Instead the author flits about from storyline to storyline, doling out dribs and drabs of Julia’s experiences through memories, amounting to about 3 of the novel’s 294 pages.

I got whiplash from the different storylines, and was not a fan of the ending. Though I didn’t like this book I will leave it up to you teen readers to decide if You want to Read it or Not.

 

“Taken” by Norah McClintock

Rated 4 stars **** Orca Book Publishers. 2009. 165 p.

TakenStephanie’s father was killed in a car accident, and she hates that her mother found a boyfriend just a few months after the accident. She hates the new boyfriend, feeling as if he’s mooching off her mom. A serial killer kidnapped two girls who look very similar to her in nearby towns, but she’s sure her town is safe. So, late one evening she declines her best friend’s advice to accompany her home, and sets out on her own. While taking a shortcut across a dark, abandoned field she’s attacked.

When Stephanie wakes she finds herself tied up in an abandoned cabin. She manages to get herself free and sets off into the woods that surround the cabin, desperate to put distance between herself and the serial killer who’d kidnapped her. With no food, water or shelter readily available she dredges up every bit of survival advice she’d learned from her grandfather on past hiking and camping trips. The days pass with no hope of rescue, and Stephanie’s situation is worsened when she steps into a hole and severely twists her ankle.

I liked reading about the things Stephanie learned about survival from her grandfather, and it seemed as if she was an exceptional learner. I also thought the ending was predictable and it felt rushed. Though it felt like I already knew how the story would play out before I even got to the end, I’ll recommend it for reluctant teen readers because it’s interesting and is a quick read.

Recommended for teens ages 13-16, especially reluctant readers.

“Jimmy” by William Malmborg

Rated 4 stars **** ebook. 2011. Darker Dreams Media.

JimmyThis extremely dark, twisted tale of a high school senior who kidnaps two teenage girls to satisfy his sexual bondage desires was very upsetting to me because it was too scarily realistic. All the clues that seemed to point to Jimmy doing something strange in his spare time went unnoticed, as no one suspected him because he was just so normal. This is what makes all the evil he got away with so upsetting to me.

I hope anyone reading this book won’t get any ideas of doing what Jimmy did, and I also hope if anyone suspects someone of similar actions that they’ll say something to someone in authority before it’s too late. I feel as troubled after reading this book as I felt when I finished watching the movie “The silence of the lambs.” I was very troubled after that movie and couldn’t sleep for a few hours. It’s now 12:42 a.m., and I have the feeling I’ll be up for a very long time tonight contemplating the evil in men’s souls after reading “Jimmy.” Thanks a lot Mr. Malmboorg!

I’m not a fan of horror books, especially ones I read at night, but the fact that this one was so realistic was what upset me the most. My heart cries out for the young ladies kidnapped by Jimmy, and for what they endured.

Recommended for mature teens ages 17 and older.

“False step” Victoria Helen Stone

Rated 3 stars *** ebook. 2019. Lake Union Publishing.

False stepVeronica had fallen out of love with her husband. When he cheated, she forgave him but felt betrayed, which made it easier to have an affair with his best friend. With Micah she felt desired. She wanted to divorce Johnny, but didn’t because Sydney loved her father and would be hurt.

Suddenly Johnny was all over the news because he’d found a missing three-year-old child while on a hike. He was a hero, but Veronica hated the attention because she was afraid someone would find out about Micah. When it was revealed the child had been kidnapped, she found Johnny with a burner phone and became suspicious. Was he having another affair? As clues began to mount, Veronica soon found that things weren’t always what they seemed, and that some secrets were better left hidden.

I was very annoyed with Veronica for almost the entire book. She was too spineless and needy. “I need a man to feel happy.” “My lover might be cheating on me.” She was so co-dependent I wanted to give her a good shake. I didn’t buy her excuses about all the men in her life.  However, though her head was in the sand for most of the book as it reached its predictable conclusion, it did have its moments of interest.

Therefore, I’ll leave it up to you Adult readers to decide if you want to read it or not.