“One was lost” Natalie D. Richards

Rated 3 stars *** ARC. Published October 4, 2016. Sourcebooks Fire. 304 p.

It was supposed to be a simple three-day senior camping wilderness trip and hike for Jude, Emily, Lonewaslostucas, Sera, Haley, Madison, and their teachers Mr. Walker and Ms. Brighton. After a day spent slogging through rain and mud, the group is separated by a torrential downpour taking out the only bridge across a raging river.

The next morning Sera, Lucas, Emily and Jude groggily awake to find descriptive words inked onto their wrists, camping supplies and phones destroyed, and their teacher too drugged to communicate. When they set out to find the others, Haley, Madison and Ms. Brighton are missing, leaving the remainder to wonder how to complete a three day journey without supplies. With dehydration, hunger and despair setting in, the clock starts ticking down the days set by a mysterious stalker. With no help in sight, the start to turn on one another but will have to learn to band together to find safety before the stalker finds them.

I took away 2 stars because the author had members of the group constantly refer to a time when they listened to stories of a missing girl and a ghost around a campfire, but failed to actually write about this event. She had them circle back to these stories many times, making it feel as if part of the book was missing since I was left to guess at the details. I also didn’t like how Sera always compared herself to her mother, ad nauseam, and was not happy with how the author handled Emily’s story – especially at the end.

However I did like the suspense and cliffhanger endings, which is the only reason I gave it 3 stars.

Recommended, with reservations, for ages 14 and older.

“The perfect stranger” Megan Miranda

Rated 2 stars ** ARC. Ebook. To be published May 16, 2017. Simon & Schuster.
Forced to resign from her reporter job in Boston, Leah theperfectstrangerreacquaints herself with Emmy, an old friend. Both women need a new beginning, so decide to rent a home in a small Pennsylvania town. Now a high school teacher, Leah struggles to come to grips with what happened in Boston while trying to figure out how to start her life anew.

One day, Leah realizes she hasn’t seen Emmy in almost 5 days. When a young woman is found bludgeoned almost to death, Leah fears the worst and asks Kyle, a local detective, for help finding Emmy. When Emmy’s boyfriend is found murdered, clues seem to point towards Leah because no one can locate any evidence that Emmy actually existed. Each day that passes brings new fears to Leah’s life, and she will have to use every reporter skill she’s ever learned to get herself out of the hole into which someone seems to have wanted her to fall.

Billed as a sequel to “All the missing girls,” Miranda’s “The perfect stranger” seemed more as a standalone read to me. I didn’t find it to be as exciting, and it definitely wasn’t as suspenseful as “All the missing girls.”

I wasn’t a big fan, so will leave it up to you Adult readers to decide if you want to read it or not.

I received a free copy of this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

“Every falling star: The true story of how I survived and escaped North Korea” Sungju Lee & Susan McClelland

Rated 5 stars ***** ARC. Published September 13, 2016. Abrams. 316 p. (Includes Glossary as well as a list of Places and proper names.)

everyfallingstarSungju lived with his father and mother in a fine apartment in Pyongyang, the capital of North Korea. His father held a high office in the army and, as devout followers of esteemed leader Kim Il-sung, Sungju and his parents had a happy, easy life. Expected to follow in his father’s footsteps, Sungju went to a very good school and studied tae kwon do with other future leaders of the military.

In 1997, his father was kicked out of the army for unknown reasons. Forced to move to the slums of the town of Gyeong-Seong, life rapidly deteriorated. With hunger as their constant enemy, his father, soon followed by his mother, left in search of food. At the age of twelve, Sungju was left to fend for himself.

In his own words, Sungju tells how he learned to survive on the streets of various cities for four years with his gang of street “brothers,” despite starvation, beatings, and imprisonment. The story of their friendship and love, along with Sungju’s musings on governmental policy, hope, and Korean legends are woven together to create a powerful story of survival that will tug at reader’s heartstrings.

Highly recommended for ages 14 and older.

“The Memory of Things” Gae Polisner

Rated 4 stars **** ARC. Published September 6, 2016. St. Martin’s Press (Macmillan.) 275 pp. (Includes Author’s Note.)

thememoryofthingsTerror and helplessness followed the events of 9/11, felt throughout the United States and, especially, in New York City. “The Memory of Things,” released for the 15th anniversary of that tragic day, tells the story of 16-year-old Kyle and the mysterious girl he found cowering on the Brooklyn Bridge as he and others fled the horror of downtown Manhattan. In alternate voices the teens recount their stories and memories, gradually turning their terror, pain and sorrow into a sense of hopefulness and determination while falling in love.

I lived through those days as a teacher in N.Y.C., and managed to spend the past 15 years avoiding graphically descriptive yearly television documentaries or photographs of the time. It took several years before I could listen, or look at, a low flying plane without my eyes filling with tears. Even now, 15 years later, it’s still painful.

Knowing 9/11 hit me stronger than others, I was a bit leery about reviewing a book about 9/11. However, since it was a young adult book, I was hopeful it wouldn’t be too graphic. Polisner covered the feelings of loss and bewilderment that filled the days after this terror attack, while also infusing a sense of hope that radiated through Kyle’s generous nature. As she described New Yorkers’ reactions towards the events that shook us to the core, along with Kyle’s sense of duty and protectiveness towards a complete stranger, readers will get the sense that there will always be a shoulder to lean on when it’s needed to help us through the roughest of storms.

Recommended for ages 14 and older.

“Last seen leaving” Caleb Roehrig

Rated 3 stars *** ARC. Ebook. Feiwel and Friends. To be published October 4, 2016.

LastSeenLeavingFlynn is devastated to find out his girlfriend, January, had been reported missing. Prying questions from the police triggered a secret he had been hiding from everyone, and his vague answers only served to convince them of his guilt. Determined to prove his innocence he starts to dig deeper into January’s disappearance but, as he reflects on their relationship, floodgates open to his own secret that will forever change his life.

Through flashbacks and the present time, readers are drawn into Flynn and January’s lives as the author did a good job implicating various characters in the crime. I thought I knew who was guilty, but was fooled many different times.

Despite good clues in the whodunit portion, I found inconsistencies that were problematic. Would a 19-year-old be able to date a 15-year-old without anyone blinking an eye? Would the two of them be able to wander in and around a rich, private school without any kind of security system? It was these and other inconsistencies that made the story much less believable, and caused me to drop its rating down to 3 stars.

Despite my questions I will recommend “Last seen leaving” for ages 14 and older because Roehrig did a good job stringing along the reader in making several characters appear to be the “bad guy.”

I received an electronic copy of this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

“All the missing girls” Megan Miranda

Rated 4 stars **** ARC. Ebook. To be published June 28, 2016. Simon & Schuster.

AllTheMissingGirlsTen years ago Nicolette Farrell left her friends, boyfriend and family behind in her sleepy hometown of Cooley Ridge, North Carolina. Over the years she worked hard to bring herself up by her own bootstraps, and is engaged to a rich lawyer in Philadelphia with her own career. When a mysterious letter arrives from home, followed by a call from her brother, she realizes she has to return to face the demons she’s been running from ever since her best friend Corinne vanished.

It doesn’t take long for Annaleise Carter, another young woman, to disappear soon after Nic arrives in town. The police are sniffing around her ex-boyfriend Tyler, Corinne’s old boyfriend Jackson, Nic’s brother Daniel, and even her senile father. Nic doesn’t know who to believe and, as the truth is gradually revealed, her world will never be the same.

I loved the suspense in this book, and suspected everyone as I eagerly devoured it. I was sure I knew who was guilty, and was SHOCKED when Miranda played her last card and revealed her hand. I did NOT see THAT coming!

I didn’t like that the story was told backwards, which is why I gave it 4 instead of 5 stars. It’s a unique way to write, but I kept getting confused. I would read about events in one chapter that weren’t explained until the next chapter, but there was an earlier chapter after that which really came before it. HUH?! I found myself going back and forth several times to get the gist of the action, which took away from the storyline, and was especially hard to do with an ebook. Though I was not a fan of this, the suspense and whodunit atmosphere makes “All the missing girls” worth a read.

Recommended for Adults.

I received a digital copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

 

“The one that got away” Simon Wood

Rated 5 stars ***** ARC. Ebook. Published March 1, 2015. Thomas & Mercer.

TheOneThatGotAwayWhen Zoe awoke that fateful night, she didn’t have any recollection as to what could have happened. In her last memory she and her friend Hollie were traveling through Vegas having fun, but she had no clue as to how they had now wound up captives in a strange place. Managing to free herself she saw Hollie being tortured, but chose to abandon her and run for her life.

In the 15 months since the attack, Zoe’s life has drastically changed. Unable to forgive herself for leaving Hollie behind, and choosing her own life over Hollie’s, she decided to punish herself. She dropped out of graduate school, separated herself from family and friends, and blamed herself everyday for Hollie’s disappearance. However her lonely existence is shattered when she learns of the murder of a young woman, which closely matches what happened to her and her friend Hollie.

Zoe decides to work with the police to find the killer, but she doesn’t know that the killer knows exactly where she lives and wants to finish the work he’d begun fifteen months earlier. Zoe is in his crosshairs as she’s the only one that ever got away from him, and he won’t make the same mistake twice.

As Wood leads readers on a desperate chase to discover the killer’s identity before he can find Zoe, the action-packed chapters had me completely engrossed. With each move on the killer’s part bringing him ever closer to Zoe, I couldn’t help but read faster to find out what would happen next to her. “The one that got away” will make readers take a closer look at their surroundings because we now know there are killers amongst us.

Highly recommended for Adult readers.