“Holding smoke” Elle Cosimano

Rated 5 stars ***** 2016. Hyperion. 322 p. (Includes Author’s Note.)

HoldingSmokeWhile going to school, John “Smoke” Conlan worked hard to pay bills his meth addicted father left unpaid. When his father attacked him with a wrench in a drug influenced rage, he floated above his dead, battered body before returning to life after 6 minutes. While recuperating in the hospital he realized his spirit could leave his body at will. Soon after, John is accused of brutally killing his favorite teacher as well as a student who witnessed the crime. He knows a hooded man killed her, and that he killed in self-defense, but is unable to tell the court that he had been floating outside of his body when the murder occurred.

Convicted and sentenced to a juvenile prison filled with dangerous young offenders, Smoke leaves his body behind to ghostly wander the city and fulfill requests from fellow inmates. With each trip the threads that hold him to his body get thinner, but he doesn’t care as he’s ready to leave his scarred life behind. On one trip he meets Pink a tough young waitress who, unlike others, can actually see him. He soon realizes someone wants them both dead and, with time running out, will have to find the strength to hang on to make sure they both survive.

Smoke and Pink remind me of Patrick Swayze and Whoopi Goldberg in the 1990 movie “Ghost.” Cosimano’s very believable characters, which stem from life as the daughter of a Warden and research, combine to open eyes to what goes on in many juvenile detention facilities across the country.

Highly recommended for ages 14 and older.

 

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“That darkness (Gardiner & Renner #1” Lisa Black

Rated 4 stars **** 2016. Kensington Books. 308 p.

ThatDarknessMaggie Gardiner, forensic expert, has been called to help solve various crimes in the streets of Cleveland. As the cases of dead criminals mount, her forensic work helps her detect certain patterns in how and where they were killed. Soon she concludes that someone, possibly a police officer, is deliberately killing bad guys. As Maggie begins to get closer to the truth she doesn’t know that the killer is ready to make sure her hunches don’t develop into anything more substantial. After all, isn’t he doing a good thing by helping society?

The voices of Maggie and the killer are alternated to help readers learn about the role forensic scientists play in crimes and to view the mind of a vigilante. The question that resounds throughout “is it wrong to kill if the person you kill is a criminal?” will keep readers talking (and thinking) long after the last page is turned.

Recommended for Adults.

“Bottomland: A novel based on the murder of Rosa Mary Dean in Franklin, Tennessee” Trey Holt

Rated 1 star * Ebook. 2015. Amazon Digital Services.

BottomlandIt took me forever to read this book because it was boring and confusing. The author jumps from the 1950’s to the 1940’s, goes into the future, then reverses back to the past to do it all over again. I wasn’t sure who was coming or going, and had to reread portions to figure out what had just happened.

Though it’s supposed to be a true story of a small town murder, the author spent more time waxing poetic about the main character, his uncle, friends, sister, girlfriend and father than he did about the murdered woman.

I’m so glad I didn’t spend any money for this book. Though I didn’t like it I will leave it up to you to decide if you want to read it or not. I wish I hadn’t.

“Amid the shadows” Michael C. Grumley

Rated 2 stars ** Ebook. 2013.

AmidTheShadowsA six-year-old who sees people’s souls is chased by “bad men” after they murder her mother. Churches are blown up across the country. A teen hacker plans the release of a virus so powerful it will bring China to its knees and cause the release of nuclear warheads from the United States and Russia. Police are kidnapped and murdered. Someone plots the demise of the planet through nuclear warfare – but only on the Northern Hemisphere. Through it all, faith in God will pull you through.

Yes, ALL of these play out on the pages of this book. Though filled with too many details about things not relevant to the plot, the book shows some promise and managed to keep my interest for a little while. It was frustrating that Grumley left so many unanswered questions. Some of my questions for him are: If Zahn was Ryan’s guardian, why did he act so menacing towards him and his father? Who was bleeding in the hallway when Sarah’s mother was killed? Will the detectives ever be found? Why did Rand have a black shadow? Why did it consume Zahn? How did Sarah know about Zahn’s history and how God felt about him? I have many more, but these are a start.

Normally I don’t review self-published books, as too many authors don’t use the basics of spell check, and have bad writing skills. However this book had some promise. I suggest Grumley get a good editor who can help him whittle through his ideas and decide on a main theme. This will allow him to focus on fleshing out specific ideas so as not to get caught up in too many plot twists that will cause the main storyline to get lost. Ultimately readers will not be left scratching their heads wondering what just happened.

Not recommended due to many unanswered questions.

“Cold black earth” Sam Reaves

Rated 5 stars ***** Ebook. Thomas & Mercer. 2015.

ColdBlackEarthAfter a failed marriage and 20 years of working overseas, Rachel returned to her childhood home hoping that farm life would release pent up stress and allow her to reunite with her brother and nephew. Expecting serenity she is, instead, entangled in a murder mystery. As killings begin to randomly occur, she notices her nephew acting very strangely. When he asks her to help him out of a difficult situation, Rachel finds herself in the murderer’s crosshairs with nowhere to turn.

Reaves had me eagerly turning pages to find out whodunit, while the surprise ending left me reeling.

Highly recommended for adults.

 

“Girl in snow” Danya Kukafka

Rated 3 stars *** ARC. Ebook. Simon & Schuster. To be published August 22, 2017.

GirlInSnowFifteen-year-old Lucinda Hayes is found murdered on a snowy carousel in the park. The police have a list of suspects, but no firm leads. In alternating chapters, three people who are close to the case tell their stories. As they talk readers learn more details about their lives, as well as Lucinda’s life.

Jade hated Lucinda and wanted her gone because her boyfriend was Jade’s former best friend and only true love. To make sure Lucinda disappeared she performed a witch’s spell, and it worked. Did she kill Lucinda with her spell? Cameron loved Lucinda but, though they went to school together, Lucinda never noticed him. He liked spying on her at night but, sometimes, things went fuzzy and he didn’t always remember. He loved her, but did he kill her?

Russ is one of the detectives assigned to the case, even though he’d been partners with Cameron’s father and knows the family. As he tells his story, readers soon realize he is hiding a secret of his own. Each of these three talk about other suspects so, when the killer is finally revealed, readers will be in for a huge shock. Kukafka definitely fooled me.

Though the book has teenage protagonists, there are many themes which tilt the book more towards adult readers. Thus I will recommend it for readers eighteen and older.

Recommended for Adults.

 

“The short second life of Bree Tanner: An Eclipse novella” (Twilight #3.5) Stephenie Meyer

Rated 3 stars *** 2010. Little, Brown and Company. 178 p.

TheShortSecondLifeOfBreeTannerAfter the werewolves and Cullens fought the newborn vampires at the end of “Eclipse,” only young Bree was left alive. Earlier in the battle she had surrendered to Carlisle, who offered her sanctuary. When the Volturi arrived, readers know what happened to her.

If you’d ever wondered how a fifteen-year-old vampire became part of Victoria’s newborn army, wonder no more. In this novella readers get the back-story on life with the newborns as Bree describes their hunting and tracking techniques, while giving readers insights into the vampire vs. human world.

I really didn’t see the need for this book, and believe it was a ploy by the publishers to make more money off the “Twilight” series after it ended with the release of “Breaking dawn” in 2008. It can stand alone, and doesn’t have to be read as part of the series.

If you’re 14 years old and older, and feel like you REALLY have to devour everything about the “Twilight” series, then I’ll recommend it for you.