“Behind the red door” Megan Collins

Rated 3 stars *** ARC. ebook. Atria Books. To be published August 4, 2020.

Behind the red doorFern loves her daddy even though he was always distracted with his work. His research dealt with the effects of fear, and she was always part of his Experiments where he terrorized her for years in many ways then interviewed her about her feelings. Though she had always been truly afraid during the Experiments, his care during the follow up interviews made her feel important and loved. As she grew older the years she’d spent being tormented caused her to become anxious and develop nervous habits, but it never diminished her love for him.

When Ted called to ask for help packing for an upcoming move, Fern was thrilled because she believed he needed her. Once she arrived they took a trip to town where she picked up a book about a local woman who was kidnapped 20 years ago and was missing again. As reading about the kidnapping tugged at memories she’d long kept hidden, these remembrances began to turn her life upside down.

This book really bothered me. I can’t reveal what happened, but I can say I was not happy at how that particular situation ended. I also couldn’t understand how, as an educated Social Worker, she was so ignorant about her own father. I liked the suspense, and how she gave Fern a wonderfully loving and supportive husband.

I gave it 3 stars for its twists and turns, and will recommend it to Adults.

I received a digital advance reading copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

“Reverie” Ryan La Sala

Rated 2 stars ** 2020. Sourcebooks. 393 p.

ReverieKane Montgomery woke up in the hospital after five days, and has no idea why he stole and crashed his father’s car. With his memory gone he doesn’t know answers to any of the questions that are running through his brain, but soon discovers he’s the founding member of a group called Others. They have differing powers that enable them to defuse dreams, also known as reveries. Kane is the only one who can unravel them to keep dreamers safe, but he has no idea how to use his powers. While Kane blunders around trying to figure out his past, a drag queen Sorceress is determined to have him be part of her future. It’s only through learning to trust that Kane can create his own future.

I really disliked this book. Kane was such a wimp. By the time I’d gotten to chapter eight he’d already cried twice and, by the end of the book, had cried and thought about running away many more times. His defeatist attitude was annoying. In contrast to him was Dean Flores, my favorite character. He knew he loved Kane and was willing to fight for his man in ways that imperiled his own life, while all Kane could do was cry. Dean is the only reason this book got more than one star.

Though I didn’t like it I will leave it up to you teen readers, ages 14 and older, to decide if you want to read it or not. I wish I had not.

 

“In a dark, dark wood” Ruth Ware

Rated 3 stars *** Scout Press (Simon & Schuster). 2015. 310 p.

In a dark, dark woodNora got an email that brought forth memories she’d been repressing for 10 years from when she’d been in love with James at the age of 16. Though it had ended badly, she’d never gotten over their relationship. Her ex-best friend Clare was getting married and Flo, her maid of honor, was writing to invite her to Clare’s Hen (bachelorette) party. After debating whether or not to go Nora decided to attend.

Six people showed up to a glass walled house buried deep in the spooky woods, where she finds out Clare is marrying James. With memories overwhelming her, Nora is desperate to leave but stayed to save face though no one has phone reception, the landline goes dead, and Flo is obsessed with pleasing Clare. Getting drunk, playing silly games and passing on snide comments about each other turn to seriousness when a Ouija board spells “murderer”, and the back door opens by itself in the middle of the night.

By this time they are all paranoid so, when someone comes up the stairs and is shot dead, no one remembers who did the actual shooting that killed James. Nora developed amnesia after the shooting but, for James’ sake, is determined to recover her memories and find out what happened that night. Who shot James? Did she do it?

The book started out slow and dragged through a few chapters before it started to pick up steam. I enjoyed the suspense, and whodunit feel. I had my suspicions, but was surprised when the villain was revealed. What I didn’t like were loose ends that weren’t explained, how much Nora reverted to her high school self around Clare, and why she went to the Hen when she wasn’t invited to the wedding.

Though the book had its hiccups I will recommend it to Adult readers who like suspense. It will definitely keep you guessing.

 

“Always” Sarah Jio

Rated 3 stars *** ARC. Ebook. Ballantine Books. To be published February 7, 2017.

alwaysKailey loved Ryan, her handsome and rich fiancé who she’d been dating for 4 years. Though secretly still in love with a man from her past, they were set to marry. The day she runs into a homeless man she recognizes as Cade, the love of her life who had disappeared years earlier, her life forever changes.

Through flashbacks, readers are shown their love story, setting the stage for Cade’s disappearance and Ryan’s appearance in Kailey’s life. The more she remembers the former life she had with Cade, the more she begins to question her life with Ryan. Should she give up an old love for a new one? Could she learn to live a new life and leave her old one behind?

As Kailey debates what to do, readers easily split into Pro Ryan or Pro Cade camps. The decision is not as hard as Kailey makes it out to be; she’s just too dense to figure it out as fast as I did. In the midst of trying to understand what happened to Cade, I couldn’t figure out the point of all the “cloak and dagger” mysteries around him. “Always” was okay but was a bit too predictable, with a few too many loose ends, for me to rate it higher than three stars.

Recommended for Adults who don’t mind the occasional “huh?” thrown into their reading.

I received an Advance Reading digital copy from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

“The Memory of Things” Gae Polisner

Rated 4 stars **** ARC. Published September 6, 2016. St. Martin’s Press (Macmillan.) 275 pp. (Includes Author’s Note.)

thememoryofthingsTerror and helplessness followed the events of 9/11, felt throughout the United States and, especially, in New York City. “The Memory of Things,” released for the 15th anniversary of that tragic day, tells the story of 16-year-old Kyle and the mysterious girl he found cowering on the Brooklyn Bridge as he and others fled the horror of downtown Manhattan. In alternate voices the teens recount their stories and memories, gradually turning their terror, pain and sorrow into a sense of hopefulness and determination while falling in love.

I lived through those days as a teacher in N.Y.C., and managed to spend the past 15 years avoiding graphically descriptive yearly television documentaries or photographs of the time. It took several years before I could listen, or look at, a low flying plane without my eyes filling with tears. Even now, 15 years later, it’s still painful.

Knowing 9/11 hit me stronger than others, I was a bit leery about reviewing a book about 9/11. However, since it was a young adult book, I was hopeful it wouldn’t be too graphic. Polisner covered the feelings of loss and bewilderment that filled the days after this terror attack, while also infusing a sense of hope that radiated through Kyle’s generous nature. As she described New Yorkers’ reactions towards the events that shook us to the core, along with Kyle’s sense of duty and protectiveness towards a complete stranger, readers will get the sense that there will always be a shoulder to lean on when it’s needed to help us through the roughest of storms.

Recommended for ages 14 and older.

“Lavina” Mary Marcus

Rated 5 stars ***** ARC. 2015. The Story Plant.

LavinaMary Jacob barely remembers her life before she was 13, growing up in Murpheysfield, Louisiana. She is shocked when her older sister calls to say her dad is dying and wants to see her, as she hasn’t spoken to either of them in years. Despite her misgivings she decides to return home, where she is soon forced to face memories she has tried so hard to forget.

Billy Ray, singer and harmonica player, left his hometown of Murpheysfield, Louisiana in 1963 when he was 15 years old and his mother, Lavina, was killed. Thirty years later he reluctantly returns for a gig and finds out Mary Jacob is in town. He knows she is the only one who knows what really happened the day his mother died, and he is determined to finally get the truth out of her.

In alternate voices Mary Jacob, Lavina and Billy Ray talk about life during Jim Crow. As their connections to each other are revealed, the past begins to blend into the present as the events that changed their lives forever are finally revealed.

“Lavina” reveals the endurance of an oppressed race as well as the complex world that existed between black and white. It will stay with you long after the last page is turned.

Highly recommended for Adults.

 

“With Malice” Eileen Cook

Rated 4 stars **** ARC. Ebook. To be published June 7, 2016. HMH Books for Young Readers.

WithMaliceJill and Simone have been best friends since fourth grade even though they’re complete opposites. Simone is a cheerleader, likes to flirt with boys, drink and party while Jill enjoys blogging about world events, studying, and making sure her GPA stays at 4.0. With graduation approaching, Jill has already been accepted to Yale while Simone doesn’t yet have plans for her future.

When both girls go on a school trip to Italy, Simone is killed in a car accident and Jill is accused of her murder. Airlifted back to the United States with amnesia, broken bones and extended rehab, Jill struggles to regain her memory. She is desperate to find out what really happened before she gets sent back to Italy to face murder charges. When readers finally find out what happened that fateful day, they will be shocked. I know I was, and actually gasped out loud. Kudos to Cook for that!

Cook does a great job stringing readers along, slowly providing the back-story of Simone and Jill’s lives through teacher, family and friend interviews provided to U.S. and Italian detectives. Despite the interesting storyline, I only gave this book 4 stars instead of 5 because I had a problem with the descriptions of Italian cities and places to visit, taken from travel guidebooks. I didn’t think they were necessary to Simone and Jill’s lives, and the story Cook was unraveling about them.

Recommended for readers ages 14 and older.

I received a copy of this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.