“Projekt 1065: A novel of World War II” Alan Gratz

Rated 5 stars ***** ARC. Published October 11, 2016. Scholastic. 309 p. (Includes “Author’s Note.”)

projekt1065In 1938 Michael O’Shaunessey moved to Berlin, Germany with his parents when his father was named Irish Ambassador. Over the 6 years of living there he’d seen the Nazi Party became stronger, changing its people for the worse. It is now 1943, and things have gotten bad as Jews and other dissenters are being taken to concentration camps. Michael had never known his parents were spies for the Allies but now, at the age of 13, he found himself working with them.

When a British RAF pilot was shot down over the city, Michael and his parents discovered the Nazis had been secretly building a plane with engines instead of propellers, which could fly faster than any country’s planes and would turn the tide of the war towards Germany.

Accidentally finding the plane’s blueprints accelerated Michael’s spy role within the ranks of the Hitler Youth. As things heat up, it soon becomes evident that Michael and his parents are in grave danger. Michael will have to do all he can to make sure the Nazis don’t succeed in their plan for world domination before it’s too late.

I really enjoyed reading “Projekt 1065.” Its short, cliffhanger, fast paced chapters make it a great choice for reluctant readers, while its storyline is very interesting.

Highly recommended for ages 11-14.

“Every falling star: The true story of how I survived and escaped North Korea” Sungju Lee & Susan McClelland

Rated 5 stars ***** ARC. Published September 13, 2016. Abrams. 316 p. (Includes Glossary as well as a list of Places and proper names.)

everyfallingstarSungju lived with his father and mother in a fine apartment in Pyongyang, the capital of North Korea. His father held a high office in the army and, as devout followers of esteemed leader Kim Il-sung, Sungju and his parents had a happy, easy life. Expected to follow in his father’s footsteps, Sungju went to a very good school and studied tae kwon do with other future leaders of the military.

In 1997, his father was kicked out of the army for unknown reasons. Forced to move to the slums of the town of Gyeong-Seong, life rapidly deteriorated. With hunger as their constant enemy, his father, soon followed by his mother, left in search of food. At the age of twelve, Sungju was left to fend for himself.

In his own words, Sungju tells how he learned to survive on the streets of various cities for four years with his gang of street “brothers,” despite starvation, beatings, and imprisonment. The story of their friendship and love, along with Sungju’s musings on governmental policy, hope, and Korean legends are woven together to create a powerful story of survival that will tug at reader’s heartstrings.

Highly recommended for ages 14 and older.

“Interference” Kay Honeyman

Rated 3 stars *** ARC. Published September 27, 2016. Arthur A. Levine Books. 340 p.

interferenceKate Hamilton has spent her life walking a tightrope, as she has had to make sure to never bring scandal on the family name because her father is a politician. When he falls behind in the polls because of something her ex boyfriend did to humiliate her, he take Kate and her mother out of D.C. to spend a few months in his Texas hometown to regroup.

In her quest to get a recommendation to art school to study photography and escape politics forever, Kate winds up volunteering at her aunt’s animal shelter where she meets annoying Hunter, the handsome ex-football player. Joining the yearbook staff to use their darkroom introduces her to handsome Kyle, star quarterback, and shy Ana. With football ruling the school, and politics ruling her home, it’s only a matter of time before football and politics lead Kate into making decisions she’ll soon regret.

Recommended for ages 12-17.

 

 

 

“Girl on a plane” Miriam Moss

Rated 4 stars **** ARC. Published September 13, 2016. Houghton Mifflin. 277 p. (Includes a Postscript and a Q & A with the author).

girlonaplaneAnna’s father works for the Army, and has been stationed all over the world. Since she had to move all the time, schoolwork and making friends became challenging. So, 4 years ago, she began going to boarding school in England. That fateful September day in 1970 started out like any other trip to school. Her parents drove her to the airport, she kissed them and her little brothers goodbye, and boarded the plane thinking about how much she would be missing their stay in Bahrain.

Unfortunately, it didn’t take longer before her plane was hijacked by the PFLP (Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine). Seeking public support for their cause, they had been regularly hijacking planes, but Anna never thought her plane would be on their list. “Girl on a plane” is Anna’s story of the four harrowing days spent with the hijackers, without much food or water, not knowing if she and the other passengers would get blown up with the plane in the middle of the desert.

“Girl on a Plane” is a fictional story, based on a real life hijacking experienced by the author when she was 15 years old. During the Postscript and Q & A, readers learn of many similarities between Anna’s story and Miriam’s real life story.

I never knew there were so many hijackings in 1970, which made me very upset that the United States never thought to secure their own planes from hijackers. If they had done so back in 1970, 9/11 would never have happened. Yes these hijackings took place outside of the U.S. while we were busy in Vietnam, but one would think that we would’ve thought about securing our planes. Hindsight is 20/20, but knowing what I now know about these hijackings doesn’t make our inaction any easier to stomach.

Recommended for 14 and older.

“Sofrito” Phillippe Diederich

Rated 1 star * Ebook. ARC. 2015. Cinco Punto Press.

SofritoFrank Delgado was born in the United States from parents who had fled Castro and the Cuban revolution. All his life he hated his father for being a boring, “typical” American, who didn’t seem to have any interest in life other than work and home, and who seemed to hate anything that had to do with his former homeland.

Frank is part owner of a failing restaurant in New York, (while also failing at relationships and college.) When his business partners convince him to go to a famous restaurant in Cuba to steal a recipe for chicken that had been stolen from his Uncle, Frank discovers that Cuba (and his father) are not what he had thought.

I didn’t find the plot line of “Sofrito” to be believable. I felt the things Frank did to try and get the recipe were very unlikely, his interactions with the secret police were not plausible, and the fact that he fell in love with a prostitute in less than a week was the final nail in “Sofrito’s” coffin. In addition, I am pretty sure Cuban people don’t start every sentence with the curse word “coño.” I lost track of how many times it was said while Frank was in Cuba.

I know this book was more a “take” on the political scene of Cuba and how exiles feel disconnected or connected to the island and its memories, while locals feel very patriotic or hate its leader. However I didn’t like it, as the unrealistic storyline kept me at arm’s length.

Though I wasn’t a fan of “Sofrito,” I will leave it up to you to decide if you want to read it or not.

“Bobby Kennedy: The making of a liberal icon” Larry Tye

Rated 5 stars ***** ARC. Ebook. To be published June 5, 2016. Random House. (Includes a Preface, Chronology, Notes, an extensive Bibliography, as well as Photos and an Author’s Note.)

BobbyKennedyTheMakingOfALiberalIconFrom his first days as campaign manager in 1952 and in 1960 for his brother John’s senatorial and presidential bids, Robert F. Kennedy was a behind-the-scenes, get it done anyway you can kind of guy. This hard nose approach made him a good candidate to work with the much-despised Senator Joe McCarthy, and played an important role in his crusades against organized crime as Attorney General when John became President.

Using an incredibly diverse set of primary and secondary sources Tye explores Bobby’s relationship with his father and brother, as well as with his own demons after Jack was assassinated. Over the years, as Bobby observed and learned from those around him, he grew both mentally and emotionally which caused alienation from former colleagues. His bid for the presidency in 1968 was a chance to try and right his own wrongs, as well as those of the tumultuous 60’s, and to set America on a better path. That he never got the chance to do so is an irrevocable sadness.

Though it made me cry at times I loved, loved, LOVED this book, and willingly took the time to read every single one of the titles in Tye’s extensive Bibliography, which covered everything from films to magazines to books to interviews and more. It took me almost 3 weeks to read because I kept stopping to go online and read more details about a section. I even spent time on YouTube watching Bobby give several amazingly heartfelt speeches described by the author in various chapters.

Bobby was always my favorite Kennedy, and reading about his losses and hurts, as well as successes, fleshed him out even more for me. The more I learned about Bobby, the more I mourned his loss to our country and those he was trying to help.

The picture painted in “Bobby Kennedy: The making of a liberal icon” is that of a man who managed to rise above his early shortcomings to one who ended up caring deeply for the poor and disenfranchised. Bobby wanted to make a difference, and his story will leave readers wishing we had someone of his caliber running for office in the upcoming November presidential elections.

Highly recommended for Adults.

I received a digital copy of this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.